Skin autofluorescence in the general population

This week, researchers from our department published a paper in the journal Diabetologia, on the measurement of skin autofluorescence to estimate the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and mortality. The abstract of the paper is as follows:

Aims/hypothesis
Earlier studies have shown that skin autofluorescence measured with an AGE reader estimates the accumulation of AGEs in the skin, which increases with ageing and is associated with the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. In the present study, we examined whether the measurement of skin autofluorescence can predict 4 year risk of incident type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality in the general population.
Methods
For this prospective analysis, we included 72,880 participants of the Dutch Lifelines Cohort Study, who underwent baseline investigations between 2007 and 2013, had validated baseline skin autofluorescence values available and were not known to have diabetes or CVD. Individuals were diagnosed with incident type 2 diabetes by self-report or by a fasting blood glucose ≥7.0 mmol/l or HbA1c ≥48 mmol/mol (≥6.5%) at follow-up. Participants were diagnosed as having incident CVD (myocardial infarction, coronary interventions, cerebrovascular accident, transient ischaemic attack, intermittent claudication or vascular surgery) by self-report. Mortality was ascertained using the Municipal Personal Records Database.
Results
After a median follow-up of 4 years (range 0.5–10 years), 1056 participants (1.4%) had developed type 2 diabetes, 1258 individuals (1.7%) were diagnosed with CVD, while 928 (1.3%) had died. Baseline skin autofluorescence was elevated in participants with incident type 2 diabetes and/or CVD and in those who had died (all p < 0.001), compared with individuals who survived and remained free of the two diseases. Skin autofluorescence predicted the development of type 2 diabetes, CVD and mortality, independent of several traditional risk factors, such as the metabolic syndrome, glucose and HbA1c.
Conclusions/interpretation
The non-invasive skin autofluorescence measurement is of clinical value for screening for future risk of type 2 diabetes, CVD and mortality, independent of glycaemic measures and the metabolic syndrome.

The full paper can be found online on the Diabetologia website:
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00125-018-4769-x

HERE you can find a PowerPoint presentation explaining the concept of measuring skin autofluorescence and the results of the paper in more detail.

You may also find useful information on the website of the manufacturer of the AGe-reader:
www.diagnoptics.com

 

Publieke informatie over dit onderzoek vindt u o.a. op:

https://www.rtvnoord.nl/nieuws/201703/UMCG-apparaat-voorspelt-diabetes-en-overlijden

https://www.umcg.nl/NL/UMCG/Nieuws/Persberichten/Paginas/Slim-meetapparaatje-voorspelt-diabetes,-hart–en-vaatziekten-en-overlijden.aspx

https://www.dvhn.nl/groningen/Groningse-uitvinding-maakt-voorspellen-hartinfarct-nog-preciezer-23848890.html

https://www.telegraaf.nl/nieuws/2828789/apparaatje-voorspelt-diabetes-en-overlijden

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2186297-diabetes-can-be-diagnosed-by-simply-shining-a-light-on-your-skin/

http://pennstatehershey.adam.com/content.aspx?productId=35&gid=4300

 

Verhuizing Diabetescentrum 12 november 2018

Het Universitair DiabetesCentrum gaat binnenkort verhuizen. Vanaf 12 november vindt u in ons gebouw De Brug, op de begane grond. De gemakkelijkste ingang is nr. 47 aan de Oostersingel, zie de foto en de plattegrond. U loopt door de draaideur naar binnen, en vindt ons direct aan de linkerkant. Een bushalte is vlak in de buurt op de Oostersingel, of aan de hoofdingang van het UMCG.

Mensen die met de auto komen, parkeren het simpelst in garage Noord, en nemen dan trap of lift aan de noordelijke kant van de garage om pal naast het Diabetescentrum uit te komen. Ook uitermate comfortabel voor toegang voor mensen, die van een rolstoel afhankelijk zijn.

U vindt in de nieuwe locatie alle faciliteiten die belangrijk zijn voor uw zorg, en die u ook gewend was in het oude Triadegebouw: diabetesverpleegkundigen, diëtisten, podotherapeut, internisten, bloedafnamepunt, fundusfotografie, en de wetenschappelijk onderzoekers……

Gestational diabetes mellitus: diagnosis and outcome

Gestational diabetes mellitus: diagnosis and outcome.
Need for a revision of the Dutch perspective?
PhD ceremony: S.H. Koning, MSc
When: November 27, 2017
Start: 14:30
Promotors: prof. dr. B.H.R. (Bruce) Wolffenbuttel, P.P. van den Berg
Where: Academy building RUG, open to the public
Faculty: Medical Sciences / UMCG

 

Untreated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with an increased risk of complications for both mother and child. Many of these complications can be reduced by early diagnosis and treatment of GDM. However, worldwide there is a lack of agreement on the best way to diagnose and treat GDM.

In the Netherlands, the Dutch Society of Obstetrics and Gynaecology guideline “Diabetes and Pregnancy” for the screening and treatment of GDM was implemented in 2010. The diagnostic thresholds are based on the old WHO consensus originating from 1999 and have until now not been updated to the newest (more stringent) criteria, implemented in 2013. These new criteria have been adopted by many expert committees. However, evidence that applying the stricter criteria for GDM improves pregnancy outcomes is limited.

The research described in this thesis aimed to evaluate the current Dutch national guideline of GDM i.e. what is the outcome of GDM pregnancies using this guideline? And what are consequences when the current diagnostic criteria of GDM are to be revised?

In this thesis we have shown that the currently used national guideline for screening and treatment of GDM is successful in reducing the risk of short-term adverse outcomes, but not in reducing the likelihood of having a large-for-gestational-age neonate. We have also shown that the long-term care for GDM is far from optimal and requires further improvement. In order to further optimize GDM care and pregnancy outcomes we advise the use of more stringent blood glucose criteria for GDM diagnosis.

 

Unfavourable blood pressure and LDL-cholesterol levels in obese non-diabetic individuals

Abstract
Background: Early diagnosis and treatment of high blood pressure (BP) and cholesterol is important to reduce cardiovascular risk. We compared BP and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) as well as the quality of treatment between obese subjects and normal weight and overweight individuals.
Methods: 87,648 participants of the Lifelines study were categorised according to obesity (normal weight/ overweight/obesity) and age. Mean systolic BP and LDL-C were calculated depending on treatment, BMI, age and sex.
Results: In all age groups, except those aged 70-80 years, women had a significantly lower BP than men. Use of BP-lowering medication did not result in BP levels comparable with non-users, except in those aged 70-80 years. Despite medication, the BP was insufficiently controlled in 20-50% of participants. BP was significantly higher in obese vs. normal weight and overweight individuals of all ages, but most apparently in men younger than 50 years. Mean LDL-C varied between 2.5- .0 mmol/l. Despite higher statin use, obese participants had a higher LDL-C than those with a normal weight. Statins abolished the age-dependent LDL-C increase. Many participants did not achieve target LDL-C < 2.5 mmol/l. A small percentage of individuals treated with BP-lowering drugs were also using statins (overall 32% in men, 17% in women).
Conclusion: Obese individuals, especially men younger than 50, have a higher BP and LDL-C compared with those with overweight and a normal weight. Use of BP-lowering drugs did not revert the BP back to levels normal for the specific age and BMI group, whereas statins abolished the age-related increase in LDL-C. These data suggest that more attention is needed for active screening and treatment of cardiovascular risk factors.

Read the full article at: http://www.njmonline.nl/getpdf.php?id=1911

 

The current total economic burden of diabetes mellitus in the Netherlands

Abstract
Introduction and aim: Insight into the total economic burden of diabetes mellitus (DM) is essential for decision makers and payers. Currently available estimates for the Netherlands only include part of the total burden or are no longer up-to-date. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the current total economic burden of DM and its complications in the Netherlands, by including all the relevant cost components.
Methods: The study combined a systematic literature review to identify all relevant published information and a targeted review to identify relevant information in the grey literature. The identified evidence was then combined to estimate the current total economic burden.
Results: In 2016, there were an estimated 1.1 million DM patients in the Netherlands, of whom approximately 10% had type 1 and 90% had type 2 DM. The estimated current total economic burden of DM was € 6.8 billion in 2016. Healthcare costs (excluding costs of complications) were € 1.6 billion, direct costs of complications were € 1.3 billion and indirect costs due to productivity losses, welfare payments and complications were € 4.0 billion.
Conclusion: DM and its complications pose a substantial economic burden to the Netherlands, which is expected to rise due to changing demographics and lifestyle. Indirect costs, such as welfare payments, accounted for a large portion of the current total economic burden of DM, while these cost components are often not included in cost estimations. Publicly available data for key cost drivers such as complications were scarce.

Read the full article at: http://www.njmonline.nl/getpdf.php?id=1883

 

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